Thursday, December 1, 2016

Special Edition: Gaudium Mundo 2016

I am pleased to announce the tenth annual Gaudium Mundo, a month of holiday songs in Latin. The calendar of songs begins today, the Kalends of December, with Rudolphus, a Latin version of "Rudolph The Red-Nosed Reindeer," along with the Latin hymns Puer Natus in Bethlehem and Beata Viscera, plus Laetissimam famam, a Latin version of the Polish carol, "Wesołą nowinę."

Each song has its own page at the blog, and where possible I've included YouTube videos with music. For Rudolph, there is even a plain-chant version:



Isn't that marvelous?

If people have suggestions or additions, please let me know. The collection has grown tremendously over the years thanks to the help of so many people: thanks to you all!

And I have something new this year: an HTTPS version of the javascript widget which you can use to display the day's songs in your own blog or webpage. Now with an HTTPS version, it should also work in a secure LMS environment such as Canvas or D2L. Thanks so much to the OUCreate project at my school and Reclaim Hosting which has given me this access to HTTPS space. You can get a 200-pixel wide script or 400-pixel wide script; see the sidebar of this blog for the 200-pixel version, and the 400-pixel version is at the bottom of this post.




Monday, November 28, 2016

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: November 28

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you are looking for free copies of my books, you can find links to all of them here: Fables, Proverbs and Distichs — Free PDFs.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem quartum Kalendas Decembres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Athena and Poseidon, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Nemo solus sapit (English: No one is wise by himself).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Nil inultum remanebit (English: Nothing will remain unavenged).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Ex minimo crescit, sed non cito fama quiescit (English: From a tiny thing the rumor grows, but it does not quickly come to rest).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Oritur sol et occidit et ad locum suum revertitur, ibique renascens (Ecc. 1:5). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Cibum in matellam ne immittas: Put not meat into a pispot. Plutarche expoudeth this saying thus. Cast not good sentences into the minde of a wicked person. So that it is all one in effecte with that sayeng of Christ. Cast not perles afore swine. For speeche is the meat of the minde. But this meate is corrupted and doth putrifie, if it fal into an unsounde minde.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Deus Omnia Videt. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Dum spiramus, speramus.
While we breathe, we hope.

Non mare transisset, pavidus si nauta fuisset.
The sailor would not have crossed the sea if he had been afraid.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Canes Duo et Os, a story about two dogs fighting over a single bone (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Leo Amatorius et Silvanus, the sad story of the lion in love.

Leo Amatorius

Latin Sundials. Below you will find an image of a sundial, and for detailed information about the Latin motto see this blog postSOLI DEO GLORIA.



Friday, November 25, 2016

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: November 25

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you are a Pinterest user, you might enjoy following the Bestiaria Latina at Pinterest, and there is also a LatinLOLCat Board. I've recently started a Board for the Distich Poems.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem septimum Kalendas Decembres.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Pandora, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Cicatrix manet (English: The scar remains).

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word verb-less motto is Alteri, si tibi (English: For another as if for yourself).

ANIMAL PROVERBS: Today's animal proverb is Dum fugans canis mingit, fugiens lepus evadit (English: When the dog in pursuit stops to pee, the fleeing rabbit gets away).

POLYDORUS: Today's proverb from Polydorus is: Hic timens Charybdim, incidi in Scyllam (English: Fearing Charybdis, I fell into Scylla).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is Dathus bonorum (English: A Dathus of good things; from Adagia 1.3.33... Dathus was a proverbially prosperous colony, abounding in gold, on the shores of the Strymon river).

GREEK PROVERBS: Today's proverb is Ὑπὸ παντὶ λίθῳ σκορπίος (English: Beneath every stone, a scorpion).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Tu Mihi Omnia. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Patria sua cuique iucundissima.
To each his own homeland is most pleasant.

Si satis est, multum est.
If it is enough, it is a lot.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Formica Alata, about the dangers of getting what you ask for (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Gallus Divinus et Vulpes, a fable about a foolish prophet.

Gallus et Vulpes

Evan Millner's Fables. I thought you might enjoy Evan Millner's marvelous fable videos; they are available at YouTube.


And there's a new Latin LOLBaby; here's the blog post: Ducito bovem volentem.