Sunday, January 22, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: January 22

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you are looking for free copies of my books, you can find links to all of them here: Fables, Proverbs and Distichs — Free PDFs.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem undecimum Kalendas Februarias: Ludi Palatini.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Orpheus and the Animals, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Veritas superabit (English: The truth will triumph ... a proverb we shall see tested in the next four years!).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Scientia sol mentis (English: Knowledge is the sun of the mind)

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Optimus magister bonus liber (English: The best teacher is a good book). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog.

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Ars multa vulpi, ast una echino maxima (English: The fox has many a trick, but the hedgehog has just one big trick; from Adagia 1.5.18).

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Fortuna Vocor. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Undas numeras.
You are trying to count the waves.

Difficile est se noscere.
It is a hard thing to know oneself.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Carbonarius et Fullo, a fable of incompatibility (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Satyrus et Viator, a fable for winter.

Satyrus et Viator

Freebookapalooza: Classics. Here is today's free book online: Unpublished Legends of Virgil by Charles Godfrey Leland.

Thursday, January 19, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: January 19

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. If you are a Pinterest user, you might enjoy following the Bestiaria Latina at Pinterest or the Distich Poems Board.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem quartum decimum Kalendas Februarias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Atalanta and the Boar, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY PROVERBS: Today's tiny proverb is: Vae soli (English: Woe to the one who is alone).

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: Beneficium saepe dare, docere est reddere (English: To often do favors teaches others how to return them).

PROPER NAME PROVERBS: Today's proper name proverb from Erasmus is In Orci culum incidas (English: May you fall into Orcus's butthole, a memorable curse from Erasmus's Adagia 2.10.68).

ELIZABETHAN PROVERBS: Here is today's proverb commentary, this time by Taverner: Pluris est oculatus testis, unus quam auriti decem: An eye witnesse is of more value, then tenne are witnesses, that is to say, farre more credite is to be given to suche as report the thinge they sawe with their eyes, than ten such as speake, but by heare say.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Dies Clarissima. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Ex parvo satis.
From little, enough.

Timendi causa est nescire.
Ignorance is the cause of fear.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Corvus et Mercurius, a story about a duplicitous crow (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Concubinae Duae, in which a man has two lovers.

Vir et Uxores Duae

Alchemical Latin Reader. Below you will find an animated gif that shows all 50 of the emblems from Michael Maier's Atalanta fugiens; for more information, see this blog post.

Monday, January 16, 2017

Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: January 16

Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem septimum decimum Kalendas Februarias.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Atlas, and there are more images here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

3-WORD MOTTOES: Today's 3-word motto is Fugit hora, ora (English: Time is flying: pray).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word proverb is Cura facit canos (English: Worry makes grey hairs).

RHYMING PROVERBS: Today's proverb with rhyme is: Est verum verbum: frangit Deus omne superbum (English: Here is a true saying: God shatters everything that is proud).

VULGATE VERSES: Today's verse is Diliges proximum tuum, sicut te ipsum (Gal. 5:14). For a translation, check out the polyglot Bible, in English, Hebrew, Latin and Greek, at the Sacred Texts Archive online.

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Damna Dierum. Click here for a full-sized view.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:


Amicus est unus animus in duobus corporibus.
A friend is one soul in two bodies.

Non timeo, sed caveo.
I am not afraid, but I am cautious.

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Asinus et Grammaticus , a funny story about a sneaky teacher (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Grus et Lupus, a famous story about the danger of doing favors for wolves, real and metaphorical.

lupus et grus

Alchemical Latin Reader. Since it has an animal theme, I wanted to include this latest item from my project on alchemical emblems, and for detailed information about the Latin, see this blog post: Pullus a nido volans. Plus, it has music!



And here's a new Latin LOLBaby from Brazil: